Cynghorau Penllyn Councils © 2018                           Website designed and maintained by H G Web Designs
Cyngor Tref Y Bala Town Council
Bala is a historic market town founded by the Normans in the 12th century.  The Castle Mound was erected during this period together with the parallel pattern of the town’s streets. Roger de Mortimer’s aim in establishing the town was to calm the hostile population of the Penllyn area, which is the district surrounding the lake. At the same time the town was granted a charter and permission to create the role of the mayor - a tradition we are proud to uphold today! The name Bala indicates where a river flows from the lake – in this case, it is the River Dee which flows from the lake. Llyn Tegid (the correct name for “Bala Lake”) is the largest natural lake in Wales. The lake was formerly called "Pimblemere" -  a mis-pronunciation of "Pum Plwy - Five Parishes’ - mere" according to some. There are many examples of the town and area’s historical importance – from here, for instance, the Roman Emperor Julius Caesar obtained his army’s horses. In 1485 Henry Tudor’s army marched through the area on his journey to the Battle of Bosworth. Rhys ap Meredudd joined him and, following Henry’s victory, the family earned considerable privileges from the new king, Henry VII, which in turn led to the establishment of the Rhiwlas estate . The wool industry was important to the town, especially the tradition of knitting socks - George III insisted on wearing Bala knitted stockings to relieve his rheumatism. Bala has had a profound influence on Wales and further afield: the religious revival experienced here led to the establishment of The Bible Society after the Rev. Thomas Charles was inspired by Mary Jones’s long barefoot journey to Bala to obtain a Welsh Bible.   In this town also Betsi Cadwaladr was born.  She journeyed to the Crimea to nurse and was very instrumental in improving conditions for the wounded soldiers. On the outskirts of town is the home of Michael D Jones who was at the forefront in establishing the Welsh settlement in Patagonia. Tom Ellis, who was MP for Meirionnydd and chief whip of the Liberal Party, is commemorated in a striking sculpture on the High Street by the renowned scultor,  Sir  W Gascombe John. In the Henblas Centre nearby of Tom Ellis by the same sculptor can be seen a bust. The Henblas Centre is home to Bala Town Council and the Community Councils of the parishes of Penllyn, members of which work together to ensure high quality services for the district’s residents
Bala is a historic market town founded by the Normans in the 12th century.  The Castle Mound was erected during this period together with the parallel pattern of the town’s streets. Roger de Mortimer’s aim in establishing the town was to calm the hostile population of the Penllyn area, which is the district surrounding the lake. At the same time the town was granted a charter and permission to create the role of the mayor - a tradition we are proud to uphold today! The name Bala indicates where a river flows from the lake – in this case, it is the River Dee which flows from the lake. Llyn Tegid (the correct name for “Bala Lake”) is the largest natural lake in Wales. The lake was formerly called "Pimblemere" -  a mis-pronunciation of "Pum Plwy - Five Parishes’ - mere" according to some. There are many examples of the town and area’s historical importance – from here, for instance, the Roman Emperor Julius Caesar obtained his army’s horses. In 1485 Henry Tudor’s army marched through the area on his journey to the Battle of Bosworth. Rhys ap Meredudd joined him and, following Henry’s victory, the family earned considerable privileges from the new king, Henry VII, which in turn led to the establishment of the Rhiwlas estate . The wool industry was important to the town, especially the tradition of knitting socks - George III insisted on wearing Bala knitted stockings to relieve his rheumatism. Bala has had a profound influence on Wales and further afield: the religious revival experienced here led to the establishment of The Bible Society after the Rev. Thomas Charles was inspired by Mary Jones’s long barefoot journey to Bala to obtain a Welsh Bible.   In this town also Betsi Cadwaladr was born.  She journeyed to the Crimea to nurse and was very instrumental in improving conditions for the wounded soldiers. On the outskirts of town is the home of Michael D Jones who was at the forefront in establishing the Welsh settlement in Patagonia. Tom Ellis, who was MP for Meirionnydd and chief whip of the Liberal Party, is commemorated in a striking sculpture on the High Street by the renowned scultor,  Sir  W Gascombe John. In the Henblas Centre nearby of Tom Ellis by the same sculptor can be seen a bust. The Henblas Centre is home to Bala Town Council and the Community Councils of the parishes of Penllyn, members of which work together to ensure high quality services for the district’s residents
Cyngor Tref Y Bala Town Council
Cynghorau Penllyn Councils © 2018                           Website designed and maintained by H G Web Designs